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SMITH & KING - A DST approach to wait time in the L2 classroom.pdf (361.29 kB)

A dynamic systems approach to wait time in the second language classroom

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posted on 2017-08-15, 09:44 authored by Lesley Smith, Jim King
This study discusses how wait time—the silent pause after a teacher elicits a student response—alters classroom discourse. Previous wait time research suggests overall positive changes in both teacher and student discourse where wait time is over 1 s. However, such studies are primarily structuralist in nature and tend to reduce the intricacy of classroom behavior to distinct variables, which can be easily altered to achieve a desired result. The data presented here comes from a series of structured observations of a UK university postgraduate L2 classroom. The findings were as follows: 1) Wait time played an intricate role in determining classroom discourse patterns and heavily favored an IRF turn-taking sequence; 2) student-initiated discourse was low in all observations and favored higher proficiency students; 3) the length of individual student-initiated turns appears to have been more important than the overall number of student-initiated turns in determining the quality of classroom discourse and was not directly related to changes in wait time length; 4) extended wait time (over 2 s in length) temporarily shifted discourse out of an IRF pattern and into a new, more student-driven phase. While previously thought of as only a pedagogical tool to increase student speech, wait time is shown to be a phenomenon which develops and changes with the composite forces that affect other aspects of classroom discourse.

History

Citation

System, 2017, 68, pp. 1-14

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Education

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

System

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

0346-251X

Acceptance date

2017-05-28

Copyright date

2017

Available date

2019-06-16

Publisher version

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0346251X17304608

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 24 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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