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An unwelcome inheritance: childhood obesity after diabetes in pregnancy

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-07-04, 13:37 authored by Claire L Meek

Diabetes in pregnancy affects 20 million women per year and is associated with increased risk of obesity in offspring, leading to insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disease. Despite the substantial public health ramifications, relatively little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying obesity in these high-risk children, which creates a barrier to successful intervention. While maternal glucose itself is undeniably a major stimulus upon intrauterine growth, the degree of offspring hyperinsulinism and disturbed lipid metabolism in mothers and offspring are also likely to be implicated in the disease process. The aim of this review is to summarise current understanding of the pathophysiology of childhood obesity after intrauterine exposure to maternal hyperglycaemia and to highlight possible opportunities for intervention. I present here a new unified hypothesis for the pathophysiology of childhood obesity in infants born to mothers with diabetes, which involves self-perpetuating twin cycles of pancreatic beta cell hyperfunction and altered lipid metabolism, both acutely and chronically upregulated by intrauterine exposure to maternal hyperglycaemia. Graphical Abstract

History

Citation

Diabetologia 66, 1961–1970 (2023)

Author affiliation

College of Life Sciences Population Health Sciences

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Diabetologia

Volume

66

Issue

11

Pagination

1961 - 1970

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

issn

0012-186X

eissn

1432-0428

Acceptance date

2023-06-12

Copyright date

2023

Available date

2024-07-04

Spatial coverage

Germany

Language

en

Deposited by

Professor Claire Meek

Deposit date

2024-07-03

Rights Retention Statement

  • No