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Analysis of the Modified Rankin Scale in Randomised Controlled Trials of Acute Ischaemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

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journal contribution
posted on 2016-05-25, 14:25 authored by Aimie Nunn, Philip M. Bath, Laura J. Gray
Background. Historically, most acute stroke clinical trials were neutral statistically, with trials typically dichotomising ordinal scales, such as the modified Rankin Scale. Studies published before 2007 have shown that preserving the ordinal nature of these scales increased statistical power. A systematic review of trials published since 2007 was conducted to reevaluate statistical methods used and to assess whether practice has changed. Methods. A search of electronic databases identified RCTs published between January 2007 and July 2014 in acute ischaemic stroke using an ordinal dependency scale as the primary outcome. Findings. Forty-two RCTs were identified. The majority used a dichotomous analysis (25, 59.5%), eight (21.4%) retained the ordinal scale, and nine (19.0%) used another type of analysis. Conclusions. Trials published since 2007 still favoured dichotomous analyses over ordinal. Stroke trials, where appropriate, should consider retaining the ordinal nature of dependency scales.

History

Citation

Stroke Research and Treatment, 2016, Volume 2016, Article ID 9482876

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Stroke Research and Treatment

Publisher

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

issn

2090-8105

eissn

2042-0056

Acceptance date

2016-02-29

Copyright date

2016

Available date

2016-05-25

Publisher version

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/srt/2016/9482876/

Language

en

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