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Association between practice coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care.pdf (5.31 MB)

Association between practice coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care and subsequent hospitalisations and death: a cohort analysis using national audit data

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posted on 2023-03-24, 16:32 authored by F Cleary, L Kim, D Prieto-Merino, D Wheeler, R Steenkamp, R Fluck, D Adlam, S Denaxas, K Griffith, F Loud, S Hull, B Caplin, D Nitsch

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between practice percentage coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care with risk of subsequent hospitalisations and death.

DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using linked electronic healthcare records. 

SETTING: 637 general practitioner (GP) practices in England. PARTICIPANTS: 167 208 patients with CKD stages 3-5 identified by 2 measures of estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, separated by at least 90 days, excluding those with coded initiation of renal replacement therapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hospitalisations with cardiovascular (CV) events, heart failure (HF), acute kidney injury (AKI) and all-cause mortality RESULTS: Participants were followed for (median) 3.8 years for hospital outcomes and 4.3 years for deaths. Rates of hospitalisations with CV events and HF were lower in practices with higher percentage CKD coding. Trends of a small reduction in AKI but no substantial change in rate of deaths were also observed as CKD coding increased. Compared with patients in the median performing practice (74% coded), patients in practices coding 55% of CKD cases had a higher rate of CV hospitalisations (HR 1.061 (95% CI 1.015 to 1.109)) and HF hospitalisations (HR 1.097 (95% CI 1.013 to 1.187)) and patients in practices coding 88% of CKD cases had a reduced rate of CV hospitalisations (HR 0.957 (95% CI 0.920 to 0.996)) and HF hospitalisations (HR 0.918 (95% CI 0.855 to 0.985)). We estimate that 9.0% of CV hospitalisations and 16.0% of HF hospitalisations could be prevented by improving practice CKD coding from 55% to 88%. Prescription of antihypertensives was the most dominant predictor of a reduction in hospitalisation rates for patients with CKD, followed by albuminuria testing and use of statins. 

CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of CKD coding by GP practices were associated with lower rates of CV and HF events, which may be driven by increased use of antihypertensives and regular albuminuria testing, although residual confounding cannot be ruled out.

Funding

This research was funded by the UK MRC, grant reference MR/N013638/1. The funding body had no role in the design of the study, collection, analysis, or interpretation of data and no role in writing of the manuscript.

History

Citation

Cleary F, Kim L, PrietoMerino D, et al. Association between practice coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care and subsequent hospitalisations and death: a cohort analysis using national audit data. BMJ Open 2022;12:e064513. doi:10.1136/ bmjopen-2022-064513

Author affiliation

Department of Cardiovascular Sciences and NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

BMJ Open

Volume

12

Issue

10

Pagination

e064513

Publisher

BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP

issn

2044-6055

eissn

2044-6055

Acceptance date

2022-09-07

Copyright date

2022

Available date

2023-03-24

Language

English

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