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Associations between sedentary behaviours and cognitive function: cross-sectional and prospective findings from the UK Biobank

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posted on 2018-01-25, 09:26 authored by Kishan Bakrania, Charlotte L. Edwardson, Kamlesh Khunti, Stephan Bandelow, Melanie J. Davies, Thomas Yates
We investigated the cross-sectional and prospective associations between different sedentary behaviors and cognitive function in a large sample of adults with data stored in the UK Biobank. Baseline data were available for 502,643 participants (2006–2010, United Kingdom). Cognitive tests included prospective memory (baseline only: n = 171,585), visual-spatial memory (round 1: n = 483,832; round 2: n = 482,762), fluid intelligence (n = 165,492), and short-term numeric memory (n = 50,370). After a mean period of 5.3 years, participants (numbering from 12,091 to 114,373, depending on the test) also provided follow-up cognitive data. Sedentary behaviors (television viewing, driving, and nonoccupational computer-use time) were measured at baseline. At baseline, both television viewing and driving time were inversely associated with cognitive function across all outcomes (e.g., for each additional hour spent watching television, the total number of correct answers in the fluid intelligence test was 0.15 (99% confidence interval: 0.14, 0.16) lower. Computer-use time was positively associated with cognitive function across all outcomes. Both television viewing and driving time at baseline were positively associated with the odds of having cognitive decline at follow-up across most outcomes. Conversely, computer-use time at baseline was inversely associated with the odds of having cognitive decline at follow-up across most outcomes. This study supports health policies designed to reduce television viewing and driving in adults.

History

Citation

American Journal of Epidemiology, 2017

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

American Journal of Epidemiology

Publisher

Oxford University Press for Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health

issn

0002-9262

eissn

1476-6256

Acceptance date

2017-07-06

Copyright date

2017

Available date

2018-07-13

Publisher version

https://academic.oup.com/aje/advance-article/doi/10.1093/aje/kwx273/3964401

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 12 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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