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Capacitating militarised masculinity: Genitourinary injuries, sex/sexuality, and US military medicine

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journal contribution
posted on 2023-02-27, 11:32 authored by Jenn Hobbs

This article examines the soldiering body in relation to the increasing prevalence of genitourinary injuries in military personnel. Feminist scholars have demonstrated that the idealised masculine soldiering body are central to the workings of international politics. The article shows that US militarised masculinity operates through the selective distribution of bodily capacities. The article draws upon critical disability studies, particularly Jasbir Puar's work on capacity and debility, to argue that treatments for genitourinary injuries revolve around the production of seminal capacity. Queer and trans bodies are debilitated in these arrangements through the denial of heterosexual and cisgender capabilities to them. To unpack this argument the article analyses treatments for genitourinary injuries. The article shows that genitourinary injuries destabilise the gender identity of US service members. Through an exploration of surgical treatments, including penis transplants and reconstructive surgeries, and fertility treatments, the article shows how masculine capacitation is achieved for some US service members through the debilitation of others; in particular, queer and trans bodies, and the bodies of Iraqi and Afghan civilians.

History

Citation

Hobbs, J. (2022). Capacitating militarised masculinity: Genitourinary injuries, sex/sexuality, and US military medicine. Review of International Studies, 1-19. doi:10.1017/S0260210522000560

Author affiliation

School of History

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Review of International Studies

Pagination

1 - 19

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

issn

0260-2105

eissn

1469-9044

Acceptance date

2022-10-10

Copyright date

2022

Available date

2022-11-29

Language

en

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