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Cassini's magnetometer at Saturn

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posted on 2018-04-30, 15:38 authored by Michele Dougherty, N. Achilleos, E. Bunce, S. Cowley, G. Hunt, A. Masters, G. Provan
(Opening paragraph) Exactly one month shy of 20 years after its 15 October 1997 launch from Cape Canaveral, the Cassini–Huygens (hereafter referred to as Cassini) NASA–ESA spacecraft will end its life by burning up in the atmosphere of Saturn. This conclusion has been designed to protect any of the potentially habitable moons of Saturn (in particular Enceladus and Titan) from possible contamination by the spacecraft. It ends a mission that has been a resounding and demonstrable success: many scientific discoveries, thousands of published research papers, hundreds of graduated PhD students, and widespread excitement and inspiration among the general public and schoolchildren alike. The Cassini mission has been a truly international endeavour in which thousands of scientists and engineers from around the world, and from many different cultures, worked together towards a common goal.

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Citation

Astronomy and Geophysics, 2017, 58 (4), pp. 4.36-4.42

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/Department of Physics and Astronomy

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Astronomy and Geophysics

Publisher

Oxford University Press

issn

1366-8781

eissn

1468-4004

Copyright date

2017

Available date

2018-04-30

Publisher version

https://academic.oup.com/astrogeo/article/58/4/4.36/3988906

Language

en

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