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Constructing the Disabled Child in England, 1800–1860

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journal contribution
posted on 2015-09-22, 09:34 authored by Steven A. King
At the core of much of the historiography of disability in so far as it relates to nineteenth century England is a belief that the support offered to those with physical and mental impairments was threadbare and that such people could be and were pushed to the social margins of their communities. The current article uses poor law records, letters, newspapers and coronial inquests to suggest that officials in fact had a sophisticated sense of degrees of mental and physical impairment and relief/support systems were tailored accordingly. Like many of the pauper families who wrote to them about children with impairments I argue that officials tended to construct hierarchies of ability rather than disability and that doing so took them deeply into areas like labour market subsidy and the avoidance of institutional confinement. On the subject of children with mental and physical impairments, officials and pauper shared a common rhetorical register and strategic approach to classification and treatment.

History

Citation

Family and Community History, 2015, 18 (2), pp. 104-121

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Family and Community History

Publisher

Maney Publishing for Family and Community Historical Research Society

issn

1463-1180

eissn

1751-3812

Acceptance date

2015-07-22

Available date

2017-12-01

Publisher version

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/1463118015Z.00000000044

Notes

The file associated with this record is embargoed for 24 months from first publication, in accordance with the Publisher's policy.

Language

en

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