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Creep cavitation evolution in polycrystalline copper under conditions of stress relaxation

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posted on 2024-02-09, 17:10 authored by H Shang, A Fernández-Caballero, E Elmukashfi, TL Martin, KR Hallam, ACF Cocks, PEJ Flewitt

Creep in metals and alloys has been observed and studied extensively over the past century. Most studies are based on constant load or less frequently on constant stress conditions. Under certain stress regimes during the period of service, such as creep-fatigue (cyclic), and under displacement-controlled loading the stress can relax. This paper uses novel millimetre length-scale beam bend geometry test specimens with constant displacement to simulate stress relaxation and explore cavity nucleation and early-stage growth/closure in a model polycrystalline material, namely oxygen-free high-conductivity copper. The role of changing grain size over the range 43 μm–2350 μm has been explored. Power-law creep theoretical modelling and finite element analyses have been adopted to predict creep relaxation and explain cavity nucleation and early-stage growth/closure for the test conditions. The results are compared with the experimental observations. The overall experimental and modelling outcomes are considered with respect to the underlying creep damage mechanism.

Funding

The Physics and Mechanics of Creep Cavity Nucleation and Sintering in Energy Materials

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

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History

Author affiliation

School of Engineering, University of Leicester

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Materials Science and Engineering: A

Volume

869

Pagination

144784

Publisher

Elsevier BV

issn

0921-5093

Copyright date

2023

Available date

2024-02-09

Language

en

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