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Current provision and HCP experiences of remote care delivery and diabetes technology training for people with type 1 diabetes in the UK during the Covid‐19 pandemic

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journal contribution
posted on 2022-01-10, 15:43 authored by Hannah Forde, Pratik Choudhary, Alistair Lumb, Emma Wilmot, Sufyan Hussain
Background
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid implementation of remote care delivery in type 1 diabetes. We studied current modes of care delivery, healthcare professional experiences and impact on insulin pump training in type 1 diabetes care in the United Kingdom (UK).

Methods
The UK Diabetes Technology Network designed a 48-question survey aimed at healthcare professionals providing care in type 1 diabetes.

Results
One hundred and forty-three healthcare professionals (48% diabetes physicians, 52% diabetes educators and 88% working in adult services) from approximately 75 UK centres (52% university hospitals, 46% general and community hospitals), responded to the survey. Telephone consultations were the main modality of care delivery. There was a higher reported time taken for video consultations versus telephone (p < 0.001). Common barriers to remote consultations were patient familiarity with technology (72%) and access to patient device data (67%). We assessed the impact on insulin pump training. A reduction in total new pump starts (73%) and renewals (61%) was highlighted. Common barriers included patient digital literacy (61%), limited healthcare professional experience (46%) and time required per patient (44%). When grouped according to size of insulin pump service, pump starts and renewals in larger services were less impacted by the pandemic compared to smaller services.

Conclusion
This survey highlights UK healthcare professional experiences of remote care delivery. While supportive of virtual care models, a number of factors highlighted, especially patient digital literacy, need to be addressed to improve virtual care delivery and device training.

History

Citation

Diabetic Medicine, 2021.https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14755

Author affiliation

Diabetes Research Centre, College of Life Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Diabetic Medicine

Publisher

Wiley

issn

0742-3071

eissn

1464-5491

Acceptance date

2021-12-01

Copyright date

2021

Available date

2022-12-21

Language

en

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