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Dating the Solar System’s giant planet orbital instability using enstatite meteorites

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-05-01, 14:42 authored by Chrysa Avdellidou, Marco Delbo’, David Nesvorný, Kevin J Walsh, Alessandro Morbidelli
The giant planets of the Solar System formed on initially compact orbits, which transitioned to the current wider configuration by means of an orbital instability. The timing of that instability is poorly constrained. In this work, we use dynamical simulations to demonstrate that the instability implanted planetesimal fragments from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid main belt. We use meteorite data to show that the implantation occurred >60 million years (Myr) after the Solar System began to form. Combining this constraint with a previous upper limit derived from Jupiter’s trojan asteroids, we conclude that the orbital instability occurred 60 to 100 Myr after the beginning of Solar System formation. The giant impact that formed the Moon occurred within this range, so it might be related to the giant planet instability.

Funding

C.A., M.D., and A.M. acknowledge support from the French National Research Agency (ANR-18-CE31-0014). D.N. acknowledges support from the NASA Solar System Workings program. K.J.W. acknowledges support from the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute node, cooperative agreement no. 80ARC0M0008. A.M. acknowledges support from the European Research Council advanced grant no. 101019380.

History

Author affiliation

College of Science & Engineering/Physics & Astronomy

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Science

Volume

384

Issue

6693

Pagination

348 - 352

Publisher

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

issn

0036-8075

eissn

1095-9203

Copyright date

2024

Available date

2024-05-01

Spatial coverage

United States

Language

en

Deposited by

Dr Chrysa Avdellidou

Deposit date

2024-04-30

Data Access Statement

The output of our thermal evolution calculations, output of our dynamical simulations, our scripts for converting the implantation probability to the number of bodies, and our plotting scripts are archived at Harvard Dataverse (45). The properties of current main belt asteroids are available in data S1, which was selected from MP3C (31).

Rights Retention Statement

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