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Different frequencies of active interruptions to sitting have distinct effects on 22 h glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

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journal contribution
posted on 2021-11-10, 16:08 authored by Ashleigh R Homer, Frances C Taylor, Paddy C Dempsey, Michael J Wheeler, Parneet Sethi, Megan S Grace, Daniel J Green, Neale D Cohen, Robyn N Larsen, Bronwyn A Kingwell, Neville Owen, David W Dunstan
Background & aims: Whether the frequency of interruptions to sitting time involving simple resistance activities (SRAs), compared to uninterrupted sitting, differentially affected 22 h glycemic control in adults with medication-controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods & results: Twenty-four participants (13 men; mean ± SD age 62 ± 8 years) completed three 8 h laboratory conditions: SIT: uninterrupted sitting; SRA3: sitting interrupted with 3 min of SRAs every 30 min; and, SRA6: sitting interrupted with 6 min of SRAs every 60 min. Flash glucose monitors assessed glycemic control over a 22 h period. No differences were observed between conditions for overall 22 h glycemic control as measured by AUCtotal, mean glucose and time in hyperglycemia. During the 3.5 h post-lunch period, mean glucose was significantly lower during SRA6 (10.1 mmol·L−1, 95%CI 9.2, 11.0) compared to SIT (11.1 mmol·L−1, 95%CI 10.2, 12.0; P = 0.006). Post-lunch iAUCnet was significantly lower during SRA6 (6.2 mmol·h·L−1, 95%CI 3.3, 9.1) compared to SIT (9.9 mmol·h·L−1, 95%CI 7.0, 12.9; P = 0.003). During the post-lunch period, compared to SIT (2.2 h, 95%CI 1.7, 2.6), time in hyperglycemia was significantly lower during SRA6 (1.5 h, 95%CI 1.0, 1.9, P = 0.001). Nocturnal mean glucose was significantly lower following the SRA3 condition (7.6 mmol·L−1, 95%CI 7.1, 8.1) compared to SIT (8.1 mmol·L−1, 95%CI 7.6, 8.7, P = 0.024). Conclusions: With standardized total activity time, less-frequent active interruptions to sitting may acutely improve glycemic control; while more-frequent interruptions may be beneficial for nocturnal glucose in those with medication-controlled T2D.

Funding

This research was supported by a Heart Foundation Vanguard Grant (Award no. 101449), a NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence grant #1057608, and the Victorian Government OIS scheme. A.R.H. and F.C.T are supported by Research Training Program (RTP) Awards. P.C.D., D.J.G., N.O., B.A.K., and D.W.D. are supported by the NHMRC Fellowships scheme.

History

Citation

Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Volume 31, Issue 10, 22 September 2021, Pages 2969-2978

Author affiliation

Diabetes Research Centre, College of Life Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

Volume

31

Issue

10

Pagination

2969 - 2978

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

0939-4753

eissn

1590-3729

Acceptance date

2021-07-01

Copyright date

2021

Available date

2022-07-13

Language

English