University of Leicester
Browse

sorry, we can't preview this file

0032321720922774.pdf (541.59 kB)

Diversity and Perceptions of Immigration: How the Past Influences the Present

Download (541.59 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2021-01-18, 17:22 authored by Lauren McLaren, Anya Neundorf, Ian Paterson
The question of whether high immigration produces anti-immigration hostility has vexed researchers across multiple disciplines for decades. And yet, understanding this relationship is crucial for countries dependant on immigrant labour but concerned about its impact on social cohesion. Absent from most of this research are theories about the impact of early-years socialisation conditions on contemporary attitudes. Using the British sample of the European Social Survey (2002–2017) and two innovative approaches to modelling generational differences – generalised additive models and hierarchical age‒period‒cohort models – this paper shows that rather than producing hostility to immigration, being socialised in a context of high immigrant-origin diversity is likely to result in more positive attitudes to immigration later in life. This implies that through generational replacement, countries like the UK are likely to become increasingly tolerant of immigration over time. Importantly, however, a context of high-income inequality may diminish this effect.

History

Author affiliation

Department of Politics and International Relations

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Political Studies

Publisher

SAGE Publications

issn

0032-3217

Acceptance date

2020-04-05

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2020-06-01

Language

en

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    Exports