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Health-related quality of life associated with daytime and nocturnal hypoglycaemic events: a time trade-off survey in five countries..pdf (280.56 kB)

Health-related quality of life associated with daytime and nocturnal hypoglycaemic events: a time trade-off survey in five countries

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posted on 2015-07-10, 10:35 authored by M. Evans, Kamlesh Khunti, M. Mamdani, C. B. Galbo-Jørgensen, J. Gundgaard, M. Bøgelund, S. Harris
BACKGROUND: Hypoglycaemic events, particularly nocturnal, affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL) via acute symptoms, altered behaviour and fear of future events. We examined the respective disutility associated with a single event of daytime, nocturnal, severe and non-severe hypoglycaemia. METHODS: Representative samples were taken from Canada, Germany, Sweden, the United States and the United Kingdom. Individuals completed an internet-based questionnaire designed to quantify the HRQoL associated with different diabetes- and/or hypoglycaemia-related health states. HRQoL was measured on a utility scale: 1 (perfect health) to 0 (death) using the time trade-off method. Three populations were studied: 8286 respondents from the general population; 551 people with type 1 diabetes; and 1603 with type 2 diabetes. Respondents traded life expectancy for improved health states and evaluated the health states of well-controlled diabetes and diabetes with non-severe/severe and daytime/nocturnal hypoglycaemic events. RESULTS: In the general population, non-severe nocturnal hypoglycaemic events were associated with a 0.007 disutility compared with 0.004 for non-severe daytime episodes, equivalent to a significant 63% increase in negative impact. Severe daytime and nocturnal events were associated with a 0.057 and a 0.062 disutility, respectively, which were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: This study applies an established health economic methodology to derive disutilities associated with hypoglycaemia stratified by onset time and severity using a large multinational population. It reveals substantial individual and cumulative detrimental effects of hypoglycaemic events - particularly nocturnal - on HRQoL, reinforcing the clinical imperative of avoiding hypoglycaemia.

History

Citation

Health Qual Life Outcomes, 2013, 11 : 90

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Health Qual Life Outcomes

Publisher

BioMed Central

eissn

1477-7525

Acceptance date

2013-05-22

Copyright date

2013

Available date

2015-07-10

Publisher version

http://www.hqlo.com/content/11/1/90

Language

en

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