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Healthcare workers' views on mandatory SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in the UK: A cross-sectional, mixed-methods analysis from the UK-REACH study.

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posted on 2022-07-01, 16:11 authored by Katherine Woolf, Mayuri Gogoi, Christopher A Martin, Padmasayee Papineni, Susie Lagrata, Laura B Nellums, I Chris McManus, Anna L Guyatt, Carl Melbourne, Luke Bryant, Amit Gupta, Catherine John, Sue Carr, Martin D Tobin, Sandra Simpson, Bindu Gregary, Avinash Aujayeb, Stephen Zingwe, Rubina Reza, Laura J Gray, Kamlesh Khunti, Manish Pareek, UK-REACH Study Collaborative Group

Several countries now have mandatory SARS-CoV-2 vaccination for healthcare workers (HCWs) or the general population. HCWs' views on this are largely unknown. Using data from the nationwide UK-REACH study we aimed to understand UK HCW's views on improving SARS-CoV-2 vaccination coverage, including mandatory vaccination.Between 21st April and 26th June 2021, we administered an online questionnaire via email to 17 891 UK HCWs recruited as part of a longitudinal cohort from across the UK who had previously responded to a baseline questionnaire (primarily recruited through email) as part of the United Kingdom Research study into Ethnicity And COVID-19 outcomes in Healthcare workers (UK-REACH) nationwide prospective cohort study. We categorised responses to a free-text question "What should society do if people do not get vaccinated against COVID-19?" using qualitative content analysis. We collapsed categories into a binary variable: favours mandatory vaccination or not, using logistic regression to calculate its demographic predictors, and its occupational, health, and attitudinal predictors adjusted for demographics.Of 5633 questionnaire respondents, 3235 answered the free text question. Median age of free text responders was 47 years (IQR 36-56) and 2705 (74.3%) were female. 18% (n = 578) favoured mandatory vaccination (201 [6%] participants for HCWs and others working with vulnerable populations; 377 [12%] for the general population), but the most frequent suggestion was education (32%, n = 1047). Older HCWs (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.44-2.34 [≥55 years vs 16 years to <40 years]), HCWs vaccinated against influenza (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.11-2.01 [2 vaccines vs none]), and with more positive vaccination attitudes generally (OR 1.10; 95% CI 1.06-1.15) were more likely to favour mandatory vaccination, whereas female HCWs (OR= 0.79, 95% CI 0.63-0.96, vs male HCWs) and Black HCWs (OR=0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.85, vs white HCWs) were less likely to.Only one in six of the HCWs in this large, diverse, UK-wide sample favoured mandatory vaccination. Building trust, educating, and supporting HCWs who are hesitant about vaccination may be more acceptable, effective, and equitable.

Funding

MRC-UK Research and Innovation grant (MR/V027549/1) and the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) via the Nation

History

Citation

eClinicalMedicine 2022;46: 101346. Published online 15 March 2022. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2022.101346

Author affiliation

Department of Health Sciences; Department of Respiratory Science

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

EClinicalMedicine

Volume

46

Pagination

101346

Publisher

Elsevier BV

issn

2589-5370

eissn

2589-5370

Acceptance date

2022-03-15

Copyright date

2022

Available date

2022-07-01

Language

eng

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