University of Leicester
Browse
fpsyg-14-1261564.pdf (2.38 MB)

High-performance work systems and individual performance: a longitudinal study of the differential roles of happiness and health well-being

Download (2.38 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 2024-02-20, 15:29 authored by Lulu Shi, Marc Van Veldhoven, Dorien Kooij, Karina Van De Voorde, Maria Karanika-Murray

As a part of the growing strand of employee-centered HRM research, employee well-being is suggested to be a key mechanism that may help to explain the relationship between HRM and performance. To investigate how an employee’s well-being mediates the HRM-performance relationship, we distinguish between two types of well-being identified in prior work, happiness well-being and health well-being, and present arguments for differences in their effects on individual performance. Building on Job Demands-Resources (JDR) theory, we propose that happiness well-being positively mediates the relationship between perceived High-Performance Work Systems (HPWS) and individual task performance, while health well-being negatively mediates this focal relationship. Thus, happiness well-being fits the “mutual gains” perspective. In contrast, health well-being fits the “conflicting outcomes” perspective, and thus may be harmed by the HPWS to enhance the performance. We find partial support for our arguments in an analysis of longitudinal survey data of 420 participants spanning a total of four waves of data collection.

Funding

UK Economic and Social Research Council (Grant Number RES-061-25-0344, 2009-2011)

History

Author affiliation

College of Social Sci Arts and Humanities/Business

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Frontiers in Psychology

Volume

14

Publisher

Frontiers Media SA

eissn

1664-1078

Copyright date

2024

Available date

2024-02-20

Language

en

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC