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Implicit theories of online trolling: Evidence that attention-seeking conceptions are associated with increased psychological resilience

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posted on 2015-09-29, 09:59 authored by John Maltby, Ruth Hatcher, H. Flowe, Sarah Tazzyman, Emma Palmer, Caren Frosch, Ceri Chloe Jones, Michelle O'Reilly, Melanie Kneips, Chloe Buckley
Three studies were conducted to investigate people's conceptions of online trolls, particularly conceptions associated with psychological resilience to trolling. In Study 1, a factor analysis of participants’ ratings of characteristics of online trolls found a replicable bifactor model of conceptions of online trolls, with a general factor of general conceptions towards online trolls being identified, but five group factors (attention-conflict seeking, low self-confidence, viciousness, uneducated, amusement) as most salient. In Study 2, participants evaluated hypothetical profiles of online trolling messages to establish the validity of the five factors. Three constructs (attention-conflict seeking, viciousness, and uneducated) were actively employed when people considered profiles of online trolling scenarios. Study 3 introduced a 20-item ‘Conceptions of Online Trolls scale’ to examine the extent to which the five group factors were associated with resilience to trolling. Results indicated that viewing online trolls as seeking conflict or attention was associated with a decrease in individuals’ negative affect around previous trolling incidents. Overall, the findings suggest that adopting an implicit theories approach can further our understanding and measurement of conceptions towards trolling through the identification of five salient factors, of which at least one factor may act as a resilience strategy.

History

Citation

British Journal of Psychology

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/Themes/Neuroscience & Behaviour

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

British Journal of Psychology

Publisher

Wiley

issn

0007-1269

eissn

2044-8295

Acceptance date

2015-08-25

Copyright date

2015

Available date

2017-09-25

Publisher version

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjop.12154/full

Notes

The file associated with this record is under a 24-month embargo in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy, available at http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html. The full text may be available in the links provided above.

Language

en

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