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Important lessons learned from studies on the pharmacology of glucocorticoids in human airway smooth muscle cells: Too much of a good thing may be a problem

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journal contribution
posted on 2020-06-03, 09:44 authored by Yassine Amrani, Reynold A Panettieri, Patricia Ramos-Ramirez, Dedmer Schaafsma, Klaudia Kaczmarek, Omar Tliba

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the treatment of choice for chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Despite proven effective anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects, long-term and/or systemic use of GCs can potentially induce adverse effects. Strikingly, some recent experimental evidence suggests that GCs may even exacerbate some disease outcomes. In asthma, airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells are among the targets of GC therapy and have emerged as key contributors not only to bronchoconstriction, but also to airway inflammation and remodeling, as implied by experimental and clinical evidence. We here will review the beneficial effects of GCs on ASM cells, emphasizing the differential nature of GC effects on pro-inflammatory genes and on other features associated with asthma pathogenesis. We will also summarize evidence describing how GCs can potentially promote pro-inflammatory and remodeling features in asthma with a specific focus on ASM cells. Finally, some of the possible solutions to overcome these unanticipated effects of GCs will be discussed.

    Funding

    This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01HL111541 (O. Tliba) and 2P012HL114471 (R.A.P.).

    History

    Citation

    Pharmacology & Therapeutics Volume 213, September 2020, 107589

    Version

    • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

    Published in

    Pharmacology & Therapeutics

    Volume

    213

    Pagination

    107589 - 107589

    Publisher

    Elsevier BV

    issn

    0163-7258

    Copyright date

    2020

    Language

    en

    Publisher version

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0163725820301170

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