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Improving uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD with lay health workers: feasibility of a clinical trial.pdf (313.76 kB)

Improving uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD with lay health workers: feasibility of a clinical trial.

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posted on 2019-06-20, 08:53 authored by P White, G Gilworth, S Lewin, L Hogg, R Tuffnell, SJC Taylor, NS Hopkinson, N Hart, SJ Singh, AJ Wright
Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of a cluster randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of lay health workers (LHWs) in improving the uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in the treatment of COPD. Materials and methods: LHWs, trained in confidentiality, role boundaries, and behavior change techniques, supported patients newly referred for PR. Interactions between LHWs and participants were recorded with smartphones. Outcomes were recruitment and retention rates of LHWs, questionnaire and interview-evaluated acceptability and analysis of intervention fidelity. Results: Forty (36%) of 110 PR-experienced COPD patients applied to become LHWs. Twenty (18%) were selected for training. Twelve (11%) supported patients. Sixty-six COPD patients referred for PR received the intervention (5.5 participants per LHW). Ten LHWs were retained to the end of the study. Seventy-three percent of supported patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the intervention. LHWs delivered the intervention with appropriate style and variable fidelity. LHWs would welcome more intensive training. Based on this proof of concept, a cluster randomized controlled trial of an LHW intervention to improve uptake and completion of PR is feasible. Conclusion: PR-experienced COPD patients can be recruited, trained, and retained as LHWs to support participation in PR, and can deliver the intervention. Participant COPD patients found the intervention acceptable. A cluster randomized controlled clinical trial is feasible.

Funding

We also acknowledge the contribution of the Royal Society of Public Health from whom the LHW training was commissioned, and Diana Moss of Moss Health Skills Limited who ran the training. Further, we acknowledge the contribution of Viki McMillan who undertook the analysis of intervention delivery fidelity, with AJW, as part of her Master’s dissertation in Public Health. This paper presents independent research funded by the NIHR under its Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) Programme (Grant Reference Number PB-PG-0214-30052). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health. SL receives additional funding from the South African Medical Research Council. SJCT was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) North Thames at Bart’s Health NHS Trust.

History

Citation

International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 2019, 14, pp. 631-643

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Publisher

Dove Medical Press

eissn

1178-2005

Acceptance date

2018-12-28

Copyright date

2018

Available date

2019-06-20

Publisher version

https://www.dovepress.com/improving-uptake-and-completion-of-pulmonary-rehabilitation-in-copd-wi-peer-reviewed-article-COPD

Language

en

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