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Incorporating Simulation-Based Education Into Stroke Training

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journal contribution
posted on 2021-08-18, 09:53 authored by Nicholas R Evans, Jatinder S Minhas, Zehra Mehdi, Amit K Mistri
Simulation-based education (SBE) has become a mainstay in medical education. It is a versatile educational technique that can be applied not only to refine psychomotor skills, but also to develop the care pathways, interprofessional behavior, and clinical decision-making needed for practice as a stroke clinician.

The majority of stroke training internationally continues to follow an apprenticeship model, where trainees learn through clinical exposure while delivering patient care. Although this approach contextualizes learning to the clinical environment, it frequently involves tension between the patient-centeredness of clinical care and learner-centeredness of training needs. Consequently, it may not be possible for a single learning environment to be both patient- and learner-centered.1 A potential solution to overcome this friction is the use of simulation training; a learner-centered approach that remains patient-focused.

Advances in simulation technology and techniques have proven complementary to trends in medical education, allowing realistic learning environments for training in stroke medicine. Consequently, neurovascular SBE is becoming widespread. However, delivering SBE needs careful design and individuals who have an understanding of its underlying principles, recognizing that clinical experience alone is not a proxy for simulation instructor effectiveness.2

Here, we will consider not only the principles and practicalities for delivering effective SBE, but also how the versatility of SBE may benefit training across the range of knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for practice as a stroke clinician. [Introduction]

History

Citation

Stroke. 2021;52:e6–e9

Author affiliation

Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Stroke

Volume

52

Issue

1

Pagination

E6 - E9

Publisher

American Heart Association

issn

0039-2499

eissn

1524-4628

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2021-08-18

Spatial coverage

United States

Language

English

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