University of Leicester
Browse
fmicb-15-1361121.pdf (2.93 MB)

Induced Burkholderia prophages detected from the hemoculture: a biomarker for Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

Download (2.93 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 2024-05-14, 09:57 authored by Patoo Withatanung, Sujintana Janesomboon, Muthita Vanaporn, Veerachat Muangsombut, Sorujsiri Charoensudjai, Dave J Baker, Vanaporn Wuthiekanun, Edouard E Galyov, Martha RJ Clokie, Ozan Gundogdu, Sunee Korbsrisate

Bacteriophages (phages), viruses that infect bacteria, are found in abundance not only in the environment but also in the human body. The use of phages for the diagnosis of melioidosis, a tropical infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is emerging as a promising novel approach, but our understanding of conditions under which Burkholderia prophages can be induced remains limited. Here, we first demonstrated the isolation of Burkholderia phages from the hemocultures of melioidosis patients. The B. pseudomallei-positive hemoculture bottles were filtered to remove bacteria, and then phages were isolated and purified by spot and double agar overlay plaque assays. Forty blood samples (hemoculture-confirmed melioidosis) were tested, and phages were found in 30% of the samples. Transmission electron microscopy and genome analysis of the isolated phages, vB_HM387 and vB_HM795, showed that both phages are Myoviruses. These two phages were stable at a pH of 5–7 and temperatures of 25–37°C, suggesting their ability to survive in human blood. The genome sizes of vB_HM387 and vB_HM795 are 36.3 and 44.0 kb, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that vB_HM387 has homologs, but vB_HM795 is a novel Myovirus, suggesting the heterogeneity of Burkholderia phages in melioidosis patients. The key finding that Burkholderia phages could be isolated from the blood of melioidosis patients highlights the potential application of phage-based assays by detecting phages in blood as a pathogen-derived biomarker of infection.

Funding

This project is funded by the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT) and Mahidol University (N42A660430) together with the UK-ASEAN ILECR Scheme Application ID: 912498679. SK, PW, VM, and SJ were supported by Siriraj Research and Development Fund, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University

Thailand Africa and Asia Programme THB Core Award

Wellcome Trust

Find out more...

History

Author affiliation

College of Life Sciences/Genetics & Genome Biology

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Frontiers in Microbiology

Volume

15

Pagination

1361121

Publisher

Frontiers Media SA

issn

1664-302X

eissn

1664-302X

Copyright date

2024

Available date

2024-05-14

Spatial coverage

Switzerland

Language

eng

Deposited by

Dr Edouard Galyov

Deposit date

2024-05-09

Data Access Statement

The datasets presented in this study can be found in online repositories. The names of the repository/repositories and accession numbers can be found at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/, OR990504; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/, OR990505.

Rights Retention Statement

  • No

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC