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Is preterm birth overlooked in child and adolescent psychiatry?

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journal contribution
posted on 2021-01-07, 16:43 authored by Eilis Kennery, Elizabeth O'Nions, Dieter Wolke, Samantha Johnson
Obstetric factors have long been recognised as risk factors for the later development of poor mental health. One of the most consistently reported of these associations is for preterm birth (birth before 37 weeks’ gestation), a form of early adversity that impacts health and development across the life course. Preterm birth is not uncommon: in 2014, 10.6% of live births globally (nearly 15 million babies) were preterm.1 Advances in neonatal care since the early 1990s have dramatically increased the numbers of babies who survive extremely preterm birth (birth at < 28 weeks’ gestation) in high-income countries. This has led to growing interest in how extremely preterm birth impacts longer term outcomes including psychosocial development across the life-span.

History

Author affiliation

Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

0890-8567

Acceptance date

2020-12-10

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2021-12-16

Language

en

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