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Journals need to provide better guidance for victims of plagiarism

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posted on 2024-02-09, 11:41 authored by Andrew ColmanAndrew Colman, Tim Stokes, Carolyn Tarrant

Academics and researchers are ill prepared for what to do when they’re victims of publication misconduct, as Andrew Colman and colleagues found out when their article was plagiarised


Plagiarism in published research articles is a threat to the integrity of the scientific record, and it seems to be on the increase—boosted by the growing industry of predatory publishing.1 Open access journals of dubious quality exploit researchers by charging publication fees for rapid publication without rigorous scrutiny. Demand for easy and rapid publication of articles, in turn, arises from the increasingly competitive market in academic jobs and the demand this creates for researchers to publish journal articles. Plagiarism in predatory journals threatens to erode the integrity of higher degrees and CVs, and hence potentially the expertise of doctors, scientists, and other professionals, and of the academics who train them.

History

Author affiliation

College of Life Sciences College of Life Sciences/Psychology & Vision Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

Volume

384

Pagination

q226

Publisher

BMJ

issn

0959-8138

eissn

1756-1833

Copyright date

2024

Available date

2024-02-09

Spatial coverage

England

Language

eng

Deposited by

Professor Andrew Colman

Deposit date

2024-02-08

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