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Malpighamoeba infection compromises fluid secretion and P-glycoprotein detoxification in Malpighian tubules

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Version 2 2020-12-17, 08:58
Version 1 2020-07-16, 14:08
journal contribution
posted on 2020-12-17, 08:58 authored by Marta Rossi, Swidbert Ott, Jeremy Niven
Malpighian tubules, analogous to vertebrate nephrons, play a key role in insect osmoregulation and detoxification. Tubules can become infected with a protozoan, Malpighamoeba, which damages their epithelial cells, potentially compromising their function. Here we used a modified Ramsay assay to quantify the impact of Malpighamoeba infection on fluid secretion and P-glycoprotein-dependent detoxification by desert locust Malpighian tubules. Infected tubules have a greater surface area and a higher fluid secretion rate than uninfected tubules. Infection also impairs P-glycoprotein-dependent detoxification by reducing the net rhodamine extrusion per surface area. However, due to the increased surface area and fluid secretion rate, infected tubules have similar total net extrusion per tubule to uninfected tubules. Increased fluid secretion rate of infected tubules likely exposes locusts to greater water stress and increased energy costs. Coupled with reduced efficiency of P-glycoprotein detoxification per surface area, Malpighamoeba infection is likely to reduce insect survival in natural environments.

History

Citation

Scientific Reports volume 10, Article number: 15953 (2020)

Author affiliation

Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, College of Life Sciences

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  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Scientific Reports

Volume

10

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group

issn

2045-2322

Acceptance date

2020-06-29

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2020-09-29

Language

en

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