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Mixing qualitative methods versus methodologies: A critical reflection on communication and power in inpatient care

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Version 2 2021-06-10, 09:55
Version 1 2020-11-04, 12:11
journal contribution
posted on 2021-06-10, 09:55 authored by Michelle O'Reilly, Nikki Kiyimba, Alison Drewett
This paper offers an illustrative example to demonstrate one way of combining qualitative methods. The context for the study was a UK inpatient psychiatric hospital. Data set one was collected from weekly ward rounds where inpatient staff met with autistic patients to review medication, listen to patient concerns and make plans or adjustments in light of this. Data set two was reflective discursive interviews with patients and staff. The research objective was to critically consider the potential reasons for discrepancies in dissatisfaction reports from patients in the interviews, compared to relative compliance exhibited by patients in the ward rounds. Utilising a video-reflexive design and critical discursive psychology approach, both data sets were analysed together. It is possible to simultaneously analyse two different data sets, one naturally occurring and one researcher generated because of the epistemological congruence in the overall design. We have presented an argument for the benefits of mixing two qualitative methods, thereby extending the mixed-methods evidence base beyond the traditional discussions of quantitative and qualitative paradigms.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research

History

Citation

Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, Volume 21, Issue 1, March 2021, pp. 66-76

Author affiliation

Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, College of Life Sciences

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Counselling and Psychotherapy Research

Volume

21

Issue

1

Pagination

66-76

Publisher

Wiley

issn

1473-3145

Acceptance date

2020-10-19

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2021-06-10

Language

en

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