University of Leicester
Browse
Navigating the uncertainties of screening - LRA deposit.pdf (220.61 kB)

Navigating the uncertainties of screening: the contribution of social theory

Download (220.61 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2018-03-28, 14:31 authored by Natalie Armstrong
Screening programmes are social interventions as much as they are medical, and as such they benefit from scrutiny informed by social theory. Screening gives rise to a range of uncertainties and the debates and controversies that result are rarely confined to policy makers and health professionals. Contestations about the science underlying screening are common, and frequently enter the public sphere, engaging with wider societal themes and normative questions. The uncertainties of screening and the need to balance potential benefits against possible harms are often underestimated and underrepresented within these. In this paper, I consider the contribution of social theory to navigating the uncertainties of screening. In doing so, I focus in particular on two relatively recent developments: first, the marked shift, at least in policy terms, towards screening based on an individual’s informed consent, having weighed up the possible harms and benefits; and second, the emerging focus on overdiagnosis and overtreatment. I highlight some important ways in which social theory can add value by helping us gain analytical purchase on these issues.

History

Citation

Social Theory and Health, 2018

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Social Theory and Health

Publisher

Palgrave Macmillan

issn

1477-8211

eissn

1477-822X

Acceptance date

2018-03-01

Copyright date

2018

Available date

2019-03-21

Publisher version

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/s41285-018-0067-4

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 12 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    Keywords

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC