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Neat Science in a Messy World: The global impact of human behaviour on phage therapy, past and present

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journal contribution
posted on 2019-09-04, 09:03 authored by Elizabeth H. Jones, Andrey V. Leterov, Martha Clokie
The scientific potential of bacteriophage (phage) therapy is gaining recognition in the global fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR). However, phages are not well understood by the general population in the West and this is a major barrier to phage therapy. This piece takes an interdisciplinary approach to public “acceptability,” highlighting the significant impact that human behavior has had on the development of bacteriophage science to date, before addressing what current human factors might impact on the future exploitation of this scientific field. It argues that the history and status of phage therapy are not identical across the world, and that more understanding of different cultural attitudes in different places is essential. In addition, it argues that from a Western perspective, human issues relating to phage therapy make this science particularly susceptible to media hype and misunderstanding. Further study of the human dimensions is, therefore, crucial in any future development of phage therapy as a response to AMR.

Funding

The authors acknowledge the period of study leave granted to Dr. Elizabeth H. Jones in Autumn 2018 by University of Leicester, United Kingdom, during which this article was written. In addition, we acknowledge the Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund at the University of Leicester, which supported E.H.J. and M.C. by awarding them a “Discipline Bridges” award.

History

Citation

PHAGE, 2019, 1(1X)

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Arts

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

PHAGE

Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

eissn

2641-6549

Acceptance date

2019-06-20

Copyright date

2019

Publisher version

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/phage.2019.0002

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 12 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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