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Obesity, ethnicity and risk of critical care, mechanical ventilation and mortality in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19: Analysis of the ISARIC CCP-UK cohort.

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posted on 2022-08-30, 09:26 authored by Thomas Yates, Francesco Zaccardi, Nazrul Islam, Cameron Razieh, Clare L. Gillies, Claire A. Lawson, Yogini Chudasama, Alex Rowlands, Melanie J. Davies, Annemarie B. Docherty, Peter J.M. Openshaw, J. Kenneth Baillie, Malcolm G. Semple, ISARIC4C investigators, Kamlesh Khunti

Objective: The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  investigate  the  asso-ciation  of  obesity  with  in-  hospital  coronavirus  disease  2019  (COVID- 19) outcomes in different ethnic groups.Methods: Patients  admitted  to  hospital  with  COVID-  19  in  the  United  Kingdom  through  the  Clinical  Characterisation  Protocol  UK  (CCP-  UK)  developed  by  the  International  Severe  Acute  Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC) were included  from  February  6  to  October  12,  2020.  Ethnicity  was  classified as White, South Asian, Black, and other minority eth-nic groups. Outcomes were admission to critical care, mechani-cal  ventilation,  and  in-  hospital  mortality,  adjusted  for  age,  sex,  and chronic diseases.Results: Of  the  participants  included,  54,254  (age  =  76  years;  45.0%  women)  were  White,  3,728  (57  years;  41.1%  women)  were South Asian, 2,523 (58 years; 44.9% women) were Black, and  5,427  (61  years;  40.8%  women)  were  other  ethnicities.  Obesity was associated with all outcomes in all ethnic groups, with associations strongest for black ethnicities. When stratified by ethnicity and obesity status, the odds ratios for admission to critical care, mechanical ventilation, and mortality in black eth-nicities with obesity were 3.91 (3.13- 4.88), 5.03 (3.94- 6.63), and 1.93  (1.49-  2.51),  respectively,  compared  with  White  ethnicities  without obesity.Conclusions: Obesity  was  associated  with  an  elevated  risk  of  in- hospital COVID- 19 outcomes in all ethnic groups, with asso-ciations strongest in Black ethnicities.

Funding

This work was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), NIHR Applied Research Collaboration East Midlands (ARC EM), and a grant from the UK Research and Innovation - Department of Health and Social Care (UKRI- DHSC) COVID- 19 Rapid Response Rolling Call (MR/V020536/1 to TY); NIHR (award CO- CIN- 01 to MGS); the Medical Research Council (MRC; grant MC_PC_19059 to MGS); and by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at University of Liverpool. The funder/sponsor had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

History

Citation

Obesity (2021) 29, 1223-1230

Author affiliation

Diabetes Research Centre

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Obesity

Publisher

Wiley

issn

1930-7381

eissn

1930-739X

Acceptance date

2021-03-17

Copyright date

2021

Available date

2022-08-30

Spatial coverage

United States

Language

eng

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