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Patchy Invasion of Stage-Structured Alien Species with Short-Distance and Long-Distance Dispersal.

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posted on 2015-10-19, 11:08 authored by L. A. Rodrigues, D. C. Mistro, E. R. Cara, N. Petrovskaya, Sergei Petrovskii
Understanding of spatiotemporal patterns arising in invasive species spread is necessary for successful management and control of harmful species, and mathematical modeling is widely recognized as a powerful research tool to achieve this goal. The conventional view of the typical invasion pattern as a continuous population traveling front has been recently challenged by both empirical and theoretical results revealing more complicated, alternative scenarios. In particular, the so-called patchy invasion has been a focus of considerable interest; however, its theoretical study was restricted to the case where the invasive species spreads by predominantly short-distance dispersal. Meanwhile, there is considerable evidence that the long-distance dispersal is not an exotic phenomenon but a strategy that is used by many species. In this paper, we consider how the patchy invasion can be modified by the effect of the long-distance dispersal and the effect of the fat tails of the dispersal kernels.

History

Citation

Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 2015

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/Department of Mathematics

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Bulletin of Mathematical Biology

Publisher

Springer Verlag for Society for Mathematical Biology

eissn

1522-9602

Copyright date

2015

Available date

2016-10-05

Publisher version

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11538-015-0097-1

Notes

The file associated with this record is under a 12-month embargo from publication in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy, available at http://www.springer.com/gp/open-access/authors-rights/self-archiving-policy/2124. The full text may be available in the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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