University of Leicester
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Reason: This item is currently closed access.

Pharmacokinetics in sepsis

journal contribution
posted on 2019-03-20, 13:27 authored by M Charlton, JP Thompson
Sepsis is a heterogeneous syndrome caused by a dysregulated host response to systemic infection whereby uncontrolled pro- and anti-inflammatory processes lead to tissue injury, immune suppression and organ dysfunction.1 The response to sepsis has profound effects on many physiological processes and body systems. These can have significant effects on absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of drugs, with potential implications for treatment regimens and the incidence of adverse effects. Furthermore, these adverse effects may be increased or decreased by our therapeutic interventions. In addition to requiring treatment in critical care, many patients with sepsis undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article reviews the pathophysiology of sepsis in relation to its effects on the pharmacokinetics of the drugs commonly used in anaesthesia and critical care. This is needed to predict pharmacodynamic effects, ensure correct dosing and avoid harm. Altered pharmacokinetics in sepsis also has implications for drug-drug interactions but this is outside the scope of this article.

History

Citation

BJA EDUCATION, 2019, 19 (1), pp. 7-13 (7)

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Cardiovascular Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

BJA EDUCATION

Publisher

ELSEVIER SCI LTD

issn

2058-5349

eissn

2058-5357

Acceptance date

2018-09-21

Copyright date

2018

Publisher version

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2058534918301173?via=ihub

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo while permission to archive is sought from the publisher. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC