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Physical activity for antenatal and postnatal depression in women attempting to quit smoking: randomised controlled trial

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posted on 2019-07-25, 13:04 authored by A Daley, M Riaz, S Lewis, P Aveyard, T Coleman, I Manyonda, R West, B Lewis, B Marcus, A Taylor, J Ibison, A Kent, M Ussher
Background Antenatal depression is associated with harmful consequences for both the mother and child. One intervention that might be effective is participation in regular physical activity although data on this question in pregnant smokers is currently lacking. Methods Women were randomised to six-weekly sessions of smoking cessation behavioural-support, or to the same support plus 14 sessions combining treadmill exercise and physical activity consultations. Results Among 784 participants (mean gestation 16-weeks), EPDS was significantly higher in the physical activity group versus usual care at end-of-pregnancy (mean group difference (95% confidence intervals (CIs)): 0.95 (0.08 to 1.83). There was no significant difference at six-months postpartum. Conclusion A pragmatic intervention to increase physical activity in pregnant smokers did not prevent depression at end-of-pregnancy or at six-months postpartum. More effective physical activity interventions are needed in this population. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN48600346. The trial was prospectively registered on 21/07/2008.

Funding

This study was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme (grant 07.01.14).

History

Citation

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2018, 18:156

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

Publisher

BMC (part of Springer Nature)

eissn

1471-2393

Acceptance date

2018-04-26

Copyright date

2018

Available date

2019-07-25

Publisher version

https://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-018-1784-3

Notes

The data that support the findings of this study are available from Michael Ussher (author) upon reasonable request.

Language

en

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