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Prediction of type 2 diabetes risk in people with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia: model derivation and validation using UK primary care data.

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posted on 2020-11-19, 14:32 authored by Briana Coles, Kamlesh Khunti, Sarah Booth, Francesco Zaccardi, Melanie J Davies, Laura J Gray
OBJECTIVE:Using primary care data, develop and validate sex-specific prognostic models that estimate the 10-year risk of people with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia developing type 2 diabetes. DESIGN:Retrospective cohort study. SETTING:Primary care. PARTICIPANTS:154 705 adult patients with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia. PRIMARY OUTCOME:Development of type 2 diabetes. METHODS:This study used data routinely collected in UK primary care from general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Patients were split into development (n=109 077) and validation datasets (n=45 628). Potential predictor variables, including demographic and lifestyle factors, medical and family history, prescribed medications and clinical measures, were included in survival models following the imputation of missing data. Measures of calibration at 10 years and discrimination were determined using the validation dataset. RESULTS:In the development dataset, 9332 patients developed type 2 diabetes during 293 238 person-years of follow-up (31.8 (95% CI 31.2 to 32.5) per 1000 person-years). In the validation dataset, 3783 patients developed type 2 diabetes during 115 113 person-years of follow-up (32.9 (95% CI 31.8 to 33.9) per 1000 person-years). The final prognostic models comprised 14 and 16 predictor variables for males and females, respectively. Both models had good calibration and high levels of discrimination. The performance statistics for the male model were: Harrell's C statistic of 0.700 in the development and 0.701 in the validation dataset, with a calibration slope of 0.974 (95% CI 0.905 to 1.042) in the validation dataset. For the female model, Harrell's C statistics were 0.720 and 0.718, respectively, while the calibration slope was 0.994 (95% CI 0.931 to 1.057) in the validation dataset. CONCLUSION:These models could be used in primary care to identify those with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia most at risk of developing type 2 diabetes for targeted referral to the National Health Service Diabetes Prevention Programme.

History

Citation

BMJ Open 2020;10:e037937. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-037937

Author affiliation

Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

BMJ open

Volume

10

Issue

10

Pagination

e037937

Publisher

BMJ

issn

2044-6055

eissn

2044-6055

Acceptance date

2020-10-02

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2020-10-23

Spatial coverage

England

Language

eng

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