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Quantifying the Relationship Between Physical Activity Energy Expenditure and Incident Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study of Device-Measured Activity in 90,096 Adults.

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posted on 2023-06-23, 16:29 authored by Tessa Strain, Paddy C Dempsey, Katrien Wijndaele, Stephen J Sharp, Nicola Kerrison, Tomas I Gonzales, Chunxiao Li, Eleanor Wheeler, Claudia Langenberg, Søren Brage, Nick Wareham

Objective

To investigate the association between accelerometer-derived physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a cohort of middle-aged adults and within subgroups.

Research design and methods

Data were from 90,096 UK Biobank participants without prevalent diabetes (mean 62 years of age; 57% women) who wore a wrist accelerometer for 7 days. PAEE was derived from wrist acceleration using a population-specific method validated against doubly labeled water. Logistic regressions were used to assess associations between PAEE, its underlying intensity, and incident T2D, ascertained using hospital episode and mortality data up to November 2020. Models were progressively adjusted for demographic, lifestyle factors, and BMI.

Results

The association between PAEE and T2D was approximately linear (n = 2,018 events). We observed 19% (95% CI 17-21) lower odds of T2D per 5 kJ · kg-1 · d-1 in PAEE without adjustment for BMI and 11% (9-13) with BMI adjustment. The association was stronger in men than women and weaker in those with obesity and higher genetic susceptibility to obesity. There was no evidence of effect modification by genetic susceptibility to T2D or insulin resistance. For a given level of PAEE, odds of T2D were lower among those engaging in more moderate-to-vigorous activity.

Conclusions

There was a strong linear relationship between PAEE and incident T2D. A difference in PAEE equivalent to an additional daily 20-min brisk walk was associated with 19% lower odds of T2D. The association was broadly similar across population subgroups, supporting physical activity for diabetes prevention in the whole population.

Funding

Aetiology and Mechanisms of Diabetes and Related Metabolic Disorders of Later Life

Medical Research Council

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Physical Activity Epidemiology

Medical Research Council

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Physical activity epidemiology

Medical Research Council

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NIHR Cambridge BRC

National Institute for Health Research

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History

Author affiliation

Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Diabetes care

Volume

46

Issue

6

Pagination

1145-1155

Publisher

American Diabetes Association

issn

0149-5992

eissn

1935-5548

Copyright date

2023

Available date

2023-06-23

Notes

For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a Creative Commons Attribution license to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising

Spatial coverage

United States

Language

eng

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