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Real-time monitoring of exhaled volatiles using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization on a compact mass spectrometer

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posted on 2016-07-15, 10:01 authored by Liam M. Heaney, Dorota M. Ruszkiewicz, Kayleigh L. Arthur, Andria Hadjithekli, Clive Aldcroft, Martin R. Lindley, C. L. Paul Thomas, Matthew A. Turner, James C. Reynolds
AIM: Breath analyses have potential to detect early signs of disease onset. Ambient ionization allows direct combination of breath gases with MS for fast, on-line analysis. Portable MS systems would facilitate field/clinic-based breath analyses. Results & methodology: Volunteers ingested peppermint oil capsules and exhaled volatile compounds were monitored over 10 h using a compact mass spectrometer. A rise and fall in exhaled menthone was observed, peaking at 60-120 min. Real-time analysis showed a gradual rise in exhaled menthone postingestion. Sensitivity was comparable to established methods, with detection in the parts per trillion range. CONCLUSION: Breath volatiles were readily analyzed on a portable mass spectrometer through a simple inlet modification. Induced changes in exhaled profiles were detectable with high sensitivity and measurable in real-time.

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Citation

Bioanalysis, 2016, 8 (13), pp. 1325-1336

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine/Department of Cardiovascular Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Bioanalysis

Publisher

Future Science

eissn

1757-6199

Copyright date

2016

Available date

2017-07-01

Publisher version

http://www.future-science.com/doi/10.4155/bio-2016-0045

Language

en

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