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Regional variations in definitions and rates of hypoglycaemia: findings from the global HAT observational study of 27 585 people with Type 1 and insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus.pdf (172.77 kB)

Regional variations in definitions and rates of hypoglycaemia: findings from the global HAT observational study of 27 585 people with Type 1 and insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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posted on 2018-09-21, 14:54 authored by K. Khunti, M. Cigrovski Berković, B. Ludvik, E. Moberg, J. Barner Lekdorf, H. Gydesen, U. Pedersen-Bjergaard
AIM: To determine participant knowledge and reporting of hypoglycaemia in the non-interventional Hypoglycaemia Assessment Tool (HAT) study. METHODS: HAT was conducted in 24 countries over a 6-month retrospective/4-week prospective period in 27 585 adults with Type 1 or insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Participants recorded whether hypoglycaemia was based on blood glucose levels, symptoms or both. RESULTS: Hypoglycaemia rates were consistently higher in the prospective compared with the retrospective period. Most respondents (96.8% Type 1 diabetes; 85.6% Type 2 diabetes) knew the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes hypoglycaemia definition, but there were regional differences in the use of blood glucose measurements and/or symptoms to define events. Confirmed symptomatic hypoglycaemia rates were highest in Northern Europe/Canada for Type 1 diabetes (63.9 events/year) and in Eastern Europe for Type 2 diabetes (19.4 events/year), and lowest in South East Asia (Type 1 diabetes: 6.0 events/year; Type 2 diabetes: 3.2 events/year). Unconfirmed symptomatic hypoglycaemia rates were highest in Eastern Europe for Type 1 diabetes (5.6 events/year) and South East Asia for Type 2 diabetes (4.7 events/year), and lowest for both in Russia (Type 1 diabetes: 2.1 events/year; Type 2 diabetes: 0.4 events/year). Participants in Latin America reported the highest rates of severe hypoglycaemia (Type 1 diabetes: 10.8 events/year; Type 2 diabetes 3.7 events/year) and severe hypoglycaemia requiring hospitalization (Type 1 diabetes: 0.56 events/year; Type 2 diabetes: 0.44 events/year). The lowest rates of severe hypoglycaemia were reported in South East Asia (Type 1 diabetes: 2.0 events/year) and Northern Europe/Canada (Type 2 diabetes: 1.3 events/year), and the lowest rates of severe hypoglycaemia requiring hospitalization were in Russia (Type 1 diabetes: 0.15 events/year; Type 2 diabetes: 0.09 events/year). The blood glucose cut-off used to define hypoglycaemia varied between regions (Type 1 diabetes: 3.1-3.6 mmol/l; Type 2 diabetes: 3.5-3.8 mmol/l). CONCLUSIONS: Under-reporting of hypoglycaemia rates in retrospective recall and regional variations in participant definitions of hypoglycaemia may contribute to the global differences in reported rates. Discrepancies between participant definitions and guidelines may highlight a need to redefine hypoglycaemia criteria. (Clinical Trials Registry No: NCT01696266).

Funding

This study was sponsored by Novo Nordisk and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01696266.

History

Citation

Diabetic Medicine, 2018, 35(9), pp. 1232-1241

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Diabetes Research Centre

Source

Presented in part as a poster at the 51st Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), 14–18 September 2015, Stockholm, Sweden.

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Diabetic Medicine

Publisher

Wiley for Diabetes UK

issn

0742-3071

eissn

1464-5491

Acceptance date

2018-04-27

Copyright date

2018

Available date

2018-09-21

Publisher version

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/dme.13662

Temporal coverage: start date

2015-09-14

Temporal coverage: end date

2015-09-18

Language

en

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