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Relevance of the bruton tyrosine kinase as a target for COVID-19 therapy

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-07-01, 16:29 authored by M Rada, Z Qusairy, M Massip-Salcedo, S Macip
The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as one of the biggest global health threats worldwide. As of October 2020, more than 44 million confirmed cases and more than 1,160,000 deaths have been reported globally, and the toll is likely to be much higher before the pandemic is over. There are currently little therapeutic options available and new potential targets are intensively investigated. Recently, Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) has emerged as an interesting candidate. Elevated levels of BTK activity have been reported in blood monocytes from patients with severe COVID-19, compared with those from healthy volunteers. Importantly, various studies confirmed empirically that administration of BTK inhibitors (acalabrutinib and ibrutinib) decreased the duration of mechanical ventilation and mortality rate for hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. Herein, we review the current information regarding the role of BTK in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections and the suitability of its inhibitors as drugs to treat COVID-19. The use of BTK inhibitors in the management of COVID-19 shows promise in reducing the severity of the immune response to the infection and thus mortality. However, BTK inhibition may be contributing in other ways to inhibit the effects of the virus and this will need to be carefully studied.

History

Author affiliation

College of Life Sciences/Molecular & Cell Biology

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Molecular Cancer Research

Volume

19

Issue

4

Pagination

549 - 554

Publisher

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

issn

1541-7786

eissn

1557-3125

Copyright date

2021

Available date

2024-07-01

Spatial coverage

United States

Language

eng

Deposited by

Professor Salvador Macip Maresma

Deposit date

2024-02-12

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