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The personal and the organisational perspective on iatrogenic harm: bridging the gap through reconciliation processes

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journal contribution
posted on 2018-03-14, 16:26 authored by Graham P. Martin, Sarah Chew, Thomas R. Palser
A pervasive theme of healthcare reform globally is greater candour about the imperfections of care quality, particularly for patients and family members when things go wrong. Numerous healthcare systems now have published policies around disclosure. However, as Moore and Mello document in their paper in this issue of BMJ Quality and Safety,1 details about how, what and when to disclose are scant, and based on minimal evidence about what works for patients, families, clinicians and organisations. Moore and Mello provide important insights from New Zealand, where a mandatory system for compensation following treatment injuries has been in place for over 40 years, on how to achieve reconciliation that satisfies the concerns of aggrieved patients and carers while being acceptable to clinicians and organisation. [Opening paragraph]

History

Citation

BMJ Quality and Safety, 2017, 26 (10), pp. 779-781

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

BMJ Quality and Safety

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group

issn

2044-5415

eissn

2044-5423

Acceptance date

2017-05-17

Copyright date

2017

Available date

2018-03-14

Publisher version

http://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/26/10/779.info

Language

en

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