University of Leicester
Browse
art%3A10.1186%2Fs12931-017-0520-2.pdf (581.1 kB)

The relationship between the Leicester cough questionnaire, eosinophilic airway inflammation and asthma patient related outcomes in severe adult asthma

Download (581.1 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2017-03-16, 15:27 authored by Sushiladevi Natarajan, Robert C. Free, Peter Bradding, Lorcan McGarvey, Salman Siddiqui
Severe asthma is characterised by a variety of symptoms, which include chronic cough, however the mechanisms responsible for cough reflex hypersensitivity in asthma remain poorly elucidated. Current asthma patient-related outcome instruments such as the six-point Juniper Asthma Control Score (ACQ-6) and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) were not primarily designed to capture cough and its related morbidity in asthma. The Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) is a patient-related outcome instrument designed to capture the health-related quality of life associated with cough. To date the LCQ has not been evaluated in a severe asthma population. Methods: We evaluated 262 extensively characterised adult patients with severe asthma attending the Leicester Severe Asthma Service. All patients had a clinician diagnosis of asthma and objective physiological evidence and met the ATS/ERS criterion for servere asthma. In all patients we evaluated a) the LCQ distribution and b) the relationships between the LCQ and ACQ-6, AQLQ, airway inflammation in sputum. Results: The LCQ demonstrated the following properties; mean: 15.0, standard deviation: 4.54, median: 15.48, and range: 11.6-19.2. We found a moderate correlation between LCQ and ACQ-6 (r = - 0.605, p < 0.0001) and a LCQ and AQLQ (r = 0.710, p < 0.0001). There was no relationship between LCQ and log10 sputum percentage eosinophils (%). Conclusion: A proportion of patients with severe asthma have a significant degree of cough-related morbidity that appears independent of eosinophilic airway inflammation and is not captured fully by existing asthma patient-reported outcome instruments. Our preliminary findings suggest that further research is now required to validate the LCQ and its responsiveness in severe asthma populations to capture cough-related morbidity and response to specific interventions.

Funding

This study was supported by the National Institute for Health Research Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit.

History

Citation

Respiratory Research, 2017, 18:44

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine/Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Respiratory Research

Publisher

BioMed Central

issn

1465-9921

eissn

1465-993X

Acceptance date

2017-02-09

Available date

2017-03-16

Publisher version

http://respiratory-research.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12931-017-0520-2

Notes

The datasets during and/or analysed during the current study available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

Language

en

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    Keywords

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC