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Toward a processual theory of transformation

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posted on 2019-03-29, 13:19 authored by JB Murray, Z Brokalaki, A Bhogal-Nair, A Cermin, J Chelekis, H Cocker, T Eagar, B McAlexander, N Mitchell, R Patrick, T Robinson, J Scholz, A Thyroff, M Zavala, MA Zuniga
This paper proposes that popular culture has the potential to be progressive, opening the possibility for social change and the motivation to drive it. Based on a hermeneutic analysis of twelve popular culture cases, a processual theory of transformation is constructed. Processual theories embrace and emphasize a dynamic temporal sequence where one conceptual category sets the stage for the next. They are useful in helping to explain how complex social processes unfold over time. The processual theory presented in this paper is based on four concepts: contradictions, emotions, progressive literacy, and praxis. This theory is useful to the TCR movement in three ways: first, the theory is descriptive, helping TCR researchers understand how society changes over time; second, the theory is prescriptive, enabling TCR researchers to think about potential social change strategies; and finally, the process used in this research serves as a paradigmatic frame for theory development in TCR.

History

Citation

Journal of Business Research, 2018, in press

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Business

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Journal of Business Research

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

0148-2963

Acceptance date

2018-12-08

Copyright date

2018

Publisher version

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296318306362?via=ihub

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 18 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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