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Variation and change in a specialized register. A comparison of random and sociolinguistic sampling outcomes in Desert Island Discs.

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posted on 2019-07-10, 08:55 authored by Nicholas Smith, Cathleen Waters
Corpus-based studies of specialized registers typically sample texts using random methods as far as possible, but they disregard social characteristics of the speakers/writers. In contrast, in corpus-based studies of conversation and quantitative sociolinguistic studies, sampling is more typically designed to optimize social representation. To our knowledge, this study is the first to compare linguistic outcomes from random versus sociolinguistic sampling in a specialized register. Our data comes from the biographical radio chat show, Desert Island Discs (DID), at different points in time. We constructed two versions of a DID corpus: a sociolinguistic judgment sample based on guest demographics, and a random sample. We compare grammatical usage between them using an inductive (‘key POS-tags’) method and close manual analysis, uncovering some evidence of significant grammatical differences between the samples and differing patterns of diachronic change. We discuss the implications of our research for corpus design, representativeness and analysis in specialized registers.

Funding

We acknowledge the University of Leicester for periods of study leave and a small research grant.

History

Citation

International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 2019, 24 (2) , p. 169 - 201

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Arts

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

International Journal of Corpus Linguistics

Volume

24

Issue

2

Pagination

169-201

Publisher

John Benjamins Publishing

eissn

1569-9811

Acceptance date

2019-05-14

Copyright date

2019

Available date

2019-08-05

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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