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Wrist-worn accelerometers: recommending ~1.0 mg as the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) in daily average acceleration for inactive adults

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journal contribution
posted on 2020-10-01, 08:37 authored by Alex Rowlands, Melanie Davies, Paddy Dempsey, Charlotte Edwardson, Cameron Razieh, Thomas Yates
Physical activity is increasingly assessed using wrist-worn accelerometry.1 The primary unit of measurement is acceleration which lacks an obvious concrete meaning in the clinical and public health settings. If the scientific community agreed on a minimum clinically important difference (MCID) that would greatly help users interpret accelerometry data in a more meaningful way. Here we present converging evidence to inform estimation of the MCID in physical activity for inactive adults, expressed as average acceleration measured from wrist-worn accelerometers.

History

Citation

British Journal of Sports Medicine Published Online First: 14 September 2020. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2020-102293

Author affiliation

Diabetes Research Centre, College of Life Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

British Journal of Sports Medicine

Publisher

BMJ

issn

0306-3674

eissn

1473-0480

Acceptance date

2020-08-21

Copyright date

2020

Available date

2020-09-14

Language

en

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