University of Leicester
Browse

File(s) under embargo

1

year(s)

4

month(s)

9

day(s)

until file(s) become available

Lateralized Displays Reveal the Perceptual Locus of the Syllable Transposition Effect in Korean

journal contribution
posted on 2024-05-10, 14:32 authored by Sangyub Kim, Kevin PatersonKevin Paterson, Kichun Nam, Changwan Lee

Studies of letter transposition effects in alphabetic scripts provide compelling evidence that letter position is encoded flexibly during reading, potentially during an early, perceptual stage of visual word recognition. Recent studies additionally suggest similar flexibility in the spatial encoding of syllabic information in the Korean Hangul script. With the present research, we conducted two experiments to investigate the locus of this syllabic transposition effect. In Experiment 1, lexical decisions for foveal stimulus presentations were less accurate and slower for four-syllable nonwords created by transposing two syllables in a base word as compared to control nonwords, replicating prior evidence for a transposed syllable effect in Korean word recognition. In Experiment 2, the same stimuli were presented to the right and left visual hemifields (i.e., RVF and LVF), which project both unilaterally and contralaterally to each participant’s left and right cerebral hemisphere (i.e., LH and RH) respectively, using lateralized stimulus displays. Lexical decisions revealed a syllable transposition effect in the accuracy and latency of lexical decisions for both RVF and LVF presentations. However, response times for correct responses were longer in the LVF, and therefore the RH, as compared to the RVF/LH. As the LVF/RH appears to be selectively sensitive to the visual-perceptual attributes of words, the findings suggest that this syllable transposition effect partly finds its locus within a perceptual stage of processing. We discuss these findings in relation to current models of the spatial encoding of orthographic information during visual word recognition and accounts of visual word recognition in Korean.

Funding

This work was supported by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2021S1A5A2A01060860).

History

Author affiliation

College of Life Sciences/Psychology & Vision Sciences

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Neuropsychologia

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

0028-3932

eissn

1873-3514

Copyright date

2024

Available date

2025-10-09

Language

en

Deposited by

Professor Kevin Paterson

Deposit date

2024-05-09

Rights Retention Statement

  • No

Usage metrics

    University of Leicester Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC